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HANKS DENTAL ASSOCIATION v. INTERNATIONAL TOOTH CROWN COMPANY

May 16, 1904

HANKS DENTAL ASSOCIATION
v.
INTERNATIONAL TOOTH CROWN COMPANY



ON A CERTIFICATE FROM THE CIRCUIT COURT OF APPEALS FOR THE SECOND CIRCUIT

Fuller, Harlan, Brewer, Brown, White, Peckham, McKenna, Holmes, Day

Author: Fuller

[ 194 U.S. Page 305]

 MR. CHIEF JUSTICE FULLER, after making the foregoing statement, delivered the opinion of the court.

Section 870 of the Code of Civil Procedure of New York provides that "the deposition of a party to an action pending in a court of record or of a person who expects to be a party to an action about to be brought . . . may be taken at his own instance or at the instance of an adverse party or of a co-plaintiff or co-defendant at any time before the trial as prescribed in this article." And succeeding sections set forth how such examinations may be ordered.

In Ex parte Fisk, 113 U.S. 713, decided at October term, 1884, it was held that this statute was in conflict with section 861 of the Revised Statutes of the United States, and not within any of the exceptions to the rule therein prescribed. The sections bearing on the subject were thus summarized by Mr. Justice Miller, who delivered the opinion of the court:

"'SEC. 861. The mode of proof, in the trial of actions at common law, shall be by oral testimony any examination of witnesses in open court, except as hereinafter provided.' "'SEC. 863. The testimony of any witness may be taken in any civil cause depending in a District or Circuit Court, by deposition de bene esse, when the witness lives at a greater distance from the place of trial than one hundred miles, or is bound on a voyage to sea, or is about to go out of the United States, or out of the district in which the case is to be tried, and to a greater distance than one hundred miles from the place of trial, before the time of trial, or when he is ancient or infirm.' The remainder of this section, and §§ 864 and 865, are directory as to the officer before whom the deposition may be taken, the notice to the opposite party, and the manner of taking, testifying and returning the deposition to the court.

[ 194 U.S. Page 306]

     "'SEC. 866. In any case where it is necessary, in order to prevent a failure or delay of justice, any of the courts of the United States may grant a dedimus potestatem to take depositions according to common usage; and any Circuit Court, upon application to it as a court of equity, may, according to the usages of chancery, direct depositions to be taken in perpetuam rei memoriam, if they relate to any matters that may be cognizable in any court of the United States.'

"Section 867 authorizes the courts of the United States, in their discretion, and according to the practice in the state courts, to admit evidence so taken; and §§ 868, 869 and 870 prescribe the manner of taking such depositions, and of the use of the subpoena duces tecum, and how it may be obtained."

Mr. Justice Miller then continued: "No one can examine these provisions for procuring testimony to be used in the courts of the United States and have any reasonable doubt that, so far as they apply, they were intended to provide a system to govern the practice, in that respect, in those courts. They are, in the first place, too complete, too far-reaching, and too minute to admit of any other conclusion. But we have not only this inference from the character of the legislation, but it is enforced by the express language of the law in providing a defined mode of proof in those courts, and in specifying the only exceptions to that mode which shall be admitted."

And he further said: "Its purpose is clear to provide a mode of proof in trials at law, to the exclusion of all other modes of proof." "It is not according to common usage to call a party in advance of the trial at law, and to subject him to all the skill of opposing counsel, to extract something which he may then use or not as it suits his purpose." "Every action at law in a court of the United States must be governed by the rule or by the exceptions which the statute provides. There is no place for exceptions made by state statutes. The court is not at liberty to adopt them, or to require a party to conform to them. It has no power to subject a party to such an examination as this."

[ 194 U.S. Page 307]

     Sections 721 and 914 were held inapplicable because the law of the State was inconsistent with the law of Congress. And see Beardsley v. Littell, 14 Blatchf. 102, Blatchford, J.; United States v. Pings, 4 Fed. Rep. 714, Choate, J.; Fogg v. Fisk, 19 Fed. Rep. ...


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