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LEATHER MANUFACTURERS' BANK v. MERCHANTS' BANK.

decided: October 22, 1888.

LEATHER MANUFACTURERS' BANK
v.
MERCHANTS' BANK.



ERROR TO THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE UNITED STATES FOR THE SOUTHERN DISTRICT OF NEW YORK.

Author: Gray

[ 128 U.S. Page 33]

 MR. JUSTICE GRAY, after stating the case as above reported, delivered the opinion of the court.

The principal question argued is whether this action was barred by the statute of limitations of New York, by which any action upon a contract, obligation or liability, expressed or implied, except a judgment or a sealed instrument, must be

[ 128 U.S. Page 34]

     brought within six years after the cause of action accrues. Code of 1855, § 91; Code of 1876, § 382.

The question then is whether, if a bank, upon which a check is drawn payable to a particular person or order, pays the amount of the check to one presenting it with a forged endorsement of the payee's name, both parties supposing the endorsement to be genuine, the right of action of the bank to recover back the money from the person so obtaining it accrues immediately upon the payment of the money, or only after a demand for its repayment.

In order to avoid confusion in dealing with this question, it is important to keep in mind the difference between the liability of a bank to a depositor, and the liability to the bank of a person who was received money from it upon a forged check or order.

It is true that the liability, in either case, is that of debtor, not that of trustee or bailee; but there the resemblance ceases.

The specific money deposited does not remain the money of the depositor, but becomes the property of the bank, to be invested and used as it pleases; its obligation to the depositor is only to pay out an equal amount upon his demand or order; and proof of refusal or neglect to pay upon such demand or order is necessary to sustain an action by the depositor against the bank. The bank cannot discharge its liability to account with the depositor to the extent of the deposit, except by payment to him, or to the holder of a written order from him, usually in the form of a check. If the bank pays out money to the holder of a check upon which the name of the depositor, or of a payee or endorsee, is forged, it is simply no payment as between the bank and the depositor; and the legal state of the account between them, and the legal liability of the bank to him, remain just as if the pretended payment had not been made. First National Bank v. Whitman, 94 U.S. 343.

But as between the bank and the person obtaining money or a forged check or order, the case is quite different.The first step in bringing about the payment is the act of the holder of the check, in assuming and representing himself to have a right, which he has not, to receive the money. One

[ 128 U.S. Page 35]

     who, by presenting forged paper to a bank, procures the payment of the amount thereof to him, even if he makes to express warranty, in law represents that the paper is genuine, and, if the payment is made in ignorance of the forgery, is liable to an action by the bank to recover back the money which, in equity and good conscience, has never ceased to be its property. It is not a case in which a consideration, which has once existed, fails by subsequent election or other act of either party, or of a third person; but there is never, at any stage of the transaction, any consideration for the payment. Espy v. Bank of Cincinnati, 18 Wall. 604; Gurney v. Womersley, 4 El. & Bl. 133; Cabot Bank v. Morton, 4 Gray, 156; Aldrich v. Butts, 5 R.I. 218; White v. Continental Bank, 64 N.Y. 316.

Whenever money is paid upon the representation of the receiver that he has either a certain title in property transferred in consideration of the payment, or a certain authority to receive the money paid, when in fact he has no such title or authority, then, although there be no fraud or intentional misrepresentation on his part, yet there is no consideration for the payment, and the money remains, in equity and good conscience, the property of the payer, and may be recovered back by him, without any previous demand, as money ...


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